Saturday, August 8, 2020

Could Barak-8 be the game changer for Indian Armed Force’s

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Source:-Could Barak-8 be the game changer for Indian Armed Force’s Barak 8 also known as LR-SAM or as MR-SAM is an Indian-Israeli surface-to-air missile (SAM), designed to defend against any type of airborne threat including aircraft, helicopters, anti-ship missiles, and UAVs as well as cruise missiles and combat jets out to a maximum range of 70 km, however, reports suggest the missile has been increased to a maximum range of 90 km following “range upgrade discussions” between India and Israel during November 2014.Some news agencies have referred to the missiles range at 100 km.Both maritime and land-based versions of the system exist. The Barak-8 has been designed to defend against a variety of short-to-long-range airborne threats, including fixed-wing aircraft, helicopters, drones and projectiles. It incorporates a state-of-the-art phased array multi- mission radar, two-way data link, and a flexible command and control system that enables it to simultaneously engage multiple targets day and night and in all-weather conditions. Due to the comprehensive simulation and preliminary subsystem testing, only three flight tests are sufficient to clear the system for operational induction. Additional tests will follow the initial phase to further explore the system’s performance and capability enhancements. Barak 8 is based on the original Barak 1 missile and is expected to feature a more advanced seeker, alongside range extensions that will move it closer to medium range naval systems like the RIM-162 ESSM or even the SM-2 Standard. Israel successfully tested its improved Barak II missile on July 30, 2009. The radar system provides 360 degree coverage and the missiles can take down an incoming missile as close as 500 meters away from the ship. This missile was primarily developed by Israel to equip its warships to protect them from the Yakhont missiles which its neighbor was procuring. Israeli ships carried only short range SAMs and didn’t have modern radars capable of handling a dedicated attack by its enemies using Yakhont missiles. The answer to this problem was the extremely agile and accurate Barak-8 which packed the best available technology into a medium sized missile. With a max range of 90+ km, it operates in conjunction with the MF-STAR radar which can detect sea skimming missiles at 30-35 km range. It combined a medium range and short range missile into one missile, having a minimum engagement range of just 300 m and max of 90+ km. There are claims that a single Barak-8 can stop a BrahMos as close as 500 m from a ship. One of the reasons behind the claims is that the Barak-8 is very accurate and has an active homing radar seeker, which enables the ship to technically forget about the missile after its launch and the missile finds the target on its own although the ship does provide guidance and mid-course updates. According to Defence Experts, the missile system delivers an accurate, high quality, real-time arena situation picture and extracts low Radar Cross Section (RCS) targets even in the toughest environmental conditions. It is a digital Active Electronic Steering Array (AESA) Radar System which incorporates new and advanced technologies. The Barak 8 missile system can operate by night as well as by day in addition to all weather conditions. It is capable of successfully dealing with simultaneous threats engagements, even in severe saturation scenarios. The system has a very short reaction time and a fast missile vertical launch capability with 360 degree coverage. The system optimizes the coordination between the missile and batteries by using an advanced broadband communication network. Four variants have been proposed for service In Indian Army Navy and Airforce; Naval Barak-8 (70km) system designed for anti-air and anti-ship missile defence both long range as well point defence. This system also comprises of EL/M-2248 MF-STAR AESA radar. As per rumours it could also serve as a point defence ABM. MRSAM(70km) variant for the IAF, designed for air defence and cruise missile defence. A highly mobile shorter range variant (50km) for IA, designed for air defence as well anti-PGM capabilities which could possibly include point defence ABM capabilities (Nasr). An extended range version (150km) called Barak-8ER which in all likelihood will find its way to IN and IAF inventory. Barak-8 as an AAM. Indian air force is one of the proposed user of KS-172 and R-37. These are the long range missiles that were designed primarily for killing slower, less maneuverable platforms like large transports, refueling tankers, AWACS and other C4ISTAR platforms. But these missiles are practically useless for engaging highly maneuverable fighters because the low g-tolerance of these missile don’t allow them to do so. By rule of thumb, an AAM needs to pull atleast 4 times more g-force than the target it is engaging, something the aforementioned missiles cannot do. According to sources, Rafael and Raytheon are developing a Stunner (David’s sling program) based long range BVRAAM leveraging on the key technologies developed for program namely the dual seekers placed in its very unique “dolphin nose” and a triple pulse motor. So my question is what’s stopping India from doing the same? Here are few points in favour; Barak-8 is already in service with India as its co-developer. It has an excellent active seeker. It has 2-way datalink. It can be guided by Phalcon or DRDO AEW&CS. It has very high g performance. At 80g, it is twice that of contemporary AIM 120C5, SD-10 etc. At 60 kg, its warhead is five times larger than the one in AIM 120C5. At 4.5 meters and 275 kg weight it is not significantly longer or heavier than contemporaryBVRAAMs. At the same time it short enough to be carried internally by FGFA. By rule of thumb, an AAM has 3 times the range when the same missile is fired from the surface. This suggests that Barak-8 as AAM could very well have 200 km+ range. With use of existing technologies, this program could be very economically efficient. With Barak-8 as BVRAAM, even lower rung IAF fighters like Tejas or Mirage could kill much superior Flankers from the Eastern side at much longer distances when backed by AWACS. This could be the solution to many of IAF problems like delays in aircraft acquisition, dwindling squadron strength, less reliance on Su-30MKI, more threats neutralized with higher sortie generation. Barak-8ER It has been reported that an ER (extended range) variant of the Barak 8 is under development, which will see the missiles maximum range increased to 150 km. Designed to engage multiple beyond visual range threats, the low launch signature Barak-8ER is understood to retain the same autopilot/inertial navigation system and active radar seeker guidance as the Barak-8, although some modifications to the software and to the missile control surfaces are likely. The booster increases the length of the missile at launch from its current 4.5 m to nearly 6 m, although the length in flight after the booster has been jettisoned may be slightly less than the base Barak-8 missile, if a TVC is not present. The missile diameter and fin spans are thought to be the same as the base Barak-8. The booster weight is currently unknown, although the missile’s weight after the booster has been jettisoned is the same as that for the current Barak-8 configuration. Levy said that initial operational capability (IOC) for Barak-8ER will first be declared for the naval variant, followed by IOC for the land variant. He declined to comment on a launch customer for Barak-8ER, but noted “existing Barak-8 customers will be interested in this configuration because it offers additional capability to their current system”. The missile is expected to equip the Indian Navys future Visakhapatnam-class destroyers. MR-SAM MR-SAM is the land based configuration of the missile. It consists of a command and control system, tracking radar, missile and mobile launcher systems. Each launcher will have eight such missiles in two stacks and are launched in a canister configuration. The system is also fitted with an advanced radio frequency (RF) seeker. The Indian Army ordered five regiments of this version, which consists of about 40 launchers and 200 missiles for ₹17,000 crore (US$2.5 billion). It is expected to be deployed by 2023. Indian Army, Navy and Airforce Deals To Defend Indian Borders Spyder DEAL 9 squadron = 18 batteries = 54 launchers around 400 missiles = $ 1200 million Barak 8 NAVAL DEAL = missiles no unknown Barak 8 IAF DEAL = 9 squadrons =18 batteries = 54 launchers = 490 missiles = $2400 million Barak 8 ARMY DEAL = 3 regiments = 9 batteries = 27 launchers = 200 missiles = $2400 million. The post Could Barak-8 be the game changer for Indian Armed Force’s appeared first on Indian Defence News.Indian Defence News - Defence Update Please Visit Our Site For Latest News On Indian Army, Navy and Airforce Indian Defence News.

How Indian Navy’s INS Kalvari Can Sink World’s Mightiest Carrier Battle Groups

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Source:-How Indian Navy’s INS Kalvari Can Sink World’s Mightiest Carrier Battle Groups Indian Navy is inducting it’s Kalvari class diesel-electric submarine’s fleet rapidly. Indian Navy’s Kalvari is a Scorpene class submarine. Indian Navy just signed the contract with a french company for six Scorpene Class submarines for Indian Navy. Kalvari class was chosen over it’s Russian and German counterparts because of its combat capabilities. Kalvari Class is one of the most silent and technologically very sophisticated machines. Kalvari faced criticism when the sensitive data of the submarine was leaked about her capabilities. Indian Navy still inducted her with changes in her system. Recently, Indian Navy successfully test-fired Exocet Anti-Ship missile from INS Kalvari(The lead ship of the Kalvari Class fleet). Carrier Battle Groups are the large formation of battleships, which consist of anti-submarine vessels and aircraft, destroyers, frigates, submarine and an aircraft carrier. Carrier Battle Groups generally have huge security bubble supported by one or two nuclear submarines continuously. The important question to ponder is, how can the Kalvari class submarine, which is just a diesel electric submarine can sink the world’s mightiest carrier battle groups of the world. Kalvari’s capabilities are over hyped but there are facts that back the lethal submarine, it is a very class relative of Sweden’s Gotland class diesel-electric attack submarine. Gotland class displaces 1600 tons of water and said to be one of the stealthiest submarines in the world. It is a masterpiece of Sweden naval advancement. In 2005, there was a joint exercise between US Navy and Swedish Navy. Gotland class submarine of the Swedish Navy was tasked to attack the mighty US Carrier Battle Group. Gotland class dived and started hunting the US Ships. Despite having cutting edge anti-submarine capabilities. US flotilla didn’t able to trace or even find the small submarine. After sometime, US Ships targeted by torpedoes coming from nowhere. Gotland gone ghost underwater and started targeting USS Ronald Reagan(CVN-76). In the meantime, world’s most advance and highly sophisticated carrier battle group was sinking in front of a submarine which displaces 100 times less weight than the carrier. INS Kalvari will enhance the future submarine capabilities of India in the sea. INS Kalvari could also target a massive fleet with efficiency, without compromising its position. It will be the game changer in such conflicts, the only threat to India currently is represented by China. China is increasing it’s aircraft fleet rapidly to dominate the Indian Ocean but Kalvari class submarine seems very capable of leveling the humongous Chinese naval fleet. The post How Indian Navy’s INS Kalvari Can Sink World’s Mightiest Carrier Battle Groups appeared first on Indian Defence News.Indian Defence News - Defence Update Please Visit Our Site For Latest News On Indian Army, Navy and Airforce Indian Defence News.

How Does Indian Navy’s P-8I Poseidon Detect Submarines From The Air

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Source:-How Does Indian Navy’s P-8I Poseidon Detect Submarines From The Air The P-8 Poseidon is an aircraft designed for long-range anti-submarine warfare, anti-surface warfare and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance missions. It is capable of broad-area maritime operations. It is a derivative of the Next-Generation 737-800. It combines superior performance and reliability with an advanced mission system that ensures maximum operational capabilities in the future battle space. The P-8I aircraft is based on the Boeing Next Generation 737-800 aircraft. The forward section of the under-fuselage houses an internal weapons bay. The wings are fitted with hardpoints for carrying air-to-surface missiles. The aircraft measures of 39.47m in length, has a wingspan of 37.64m and is 12.83m high. The maximum take-off gross weight of the P-8I is around 85 tons. In 2009, India signed a US$2.1 billion deal with Boeing for the supply of eight P-8Is to replace the Navy’s aging Tupolev Tu-142M surveillance aircraft. Each aircraft has an average cost of about US$220 million. In late 2010, Government of India approved the purchase of four additional P-8Is, bringing the total number of aircraft to 12. India plans to order another 12 P-8Is at a later time. The P-8I aircraft can fly at a maximum speed of 789 km/h at a maximum altitude of 12,496m. The aircraft has a maximum range of 2,222 kms with four hours on station. This exceeds the navy’s requirement in the Request for Proposal (RFP) that asked for a radius of action of 600 miles with a time on station of six hours. The range can be further boosted by mid-air refuelling. The flight crew of the P-8I comprises of a pilot and copilot. However for missions, it needs an additional team of 7 to monitor the radar and weapons systems. The cockpit is integrated with primary flight display, multifunction displays, Identification Friend or Foe (IFF), flight management system and stores management system. The P-8I is intended to conduct anti-submarine warfare (ASW) and shipping interdiction and to engage in an electronic intelligence (ELINT) role. This will involve carrying torpedoes, depth charges, SLAM-ER anti-ship missiles, and other weapons. It will also be able to drop and monitor sonobuoys. The aircraft is equipped with a CAE AN/ASQ-508A magnetic anomaly detection (MAD) system, APS-143C(V)3 multimode radar and a global version of the Raytheon APY-10 surveillance radar. The APY-10 radar provides precise information in all weather, day and night missions. The internal weapons bay can house Mark 54 torpedoes, depth charges and free-fall bombs. The under-wing hardpoints can be armed with air-to-surface missiles. In December 2010, India requested a sale of AGM-84L Harpoon Block II anti-ship missiles and associated equipment. The Harpoon Block II carries a 226kg blast / fragmentation warhead. It can be fired against land and sea targets. Most aircrafts detect submarines using their Magnetic Anomaly Detectors (MAD). One thing that separates them from the P-8 Poseidon is that it does not have a Magnetic Anomaly Detector. It uses, among other things, passive sonar via dropped sonobouys to detect submarines. All submarines make some noise which depends upon the frequency of their electrical system. There exist gigantic databases of noises made by almost each and every submarine. This helps to distinguish between the types of submarines and their allegiance. These sonobuoys are powered by ocean water activated batteries and self scuttle after a pre-determined period of time. An aircraft may launch a field of sonobuoys to detect and track a submarine and once the submarine is located the buoy field will be advanced in the proper direction to maintain contact with the target submarine The Indian Navy has inked a deal to acquire four of these P-8 Poseidon aircrafts for around $1 billion. The Navy already has eight P-8 aircrafts presently. Currently, the eight aircraft are based at INS Rajali and are operated by Indian Naval Air Squadron 312A. Armed with deadly Harpoon Block-II missiles, MK-54 lightweight torpedoes, rockets and depth charges, these aircrafts are India’s hawk eyes over the Indian Ocean Region (IOR). It has achieved a number of operational milestones which includes participation in the search effort for Malaysian Airlines Flight MH370, the first successful firing of air launched Harpoon Block II missile in the world, torpedo firing and active participation in major naval exercises across the globe. With a maximum speed of 907 km/h and an operating range of over 1,200 nautical miles, the aircraft will be able to detect threats and neutralize them if required, far before they come anywhere near Indian shores. Source:-Defence Lovver The post How Does Indian Navy’s P-8I Poseidon Detect Submarines From The Air appeared first on Indian Defence News.Indian Defence News - Defence Update Please Visit Our Site For Latest News On Indian Army, Navy and Airforce Indian Defence News.

Do You Know Indian Kilo-Class submarine ‘Sink’ a U.S. Nuclear Attack Submarine Two...

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Source:-Do You Know Indian Kilo-Class submarine ‘Sink’ a U.S. Nuclear Attack Submarine Two Years Ago? Nonetheless, it’s not a huge surprise that a Russian-built Kilo would be able to defeat a Los Angeles-class attack boat. The Los Angeles-class is a dated design that is slowly being replaced by the newer and exponentially quieter Virginia-class submarine. However, it must be noted that we do not know the rules of engagement or parameters that the sides had agreed to. Furthermore, it must be noted there is the possibility of exaggeration. But the basic facts are that the Kilo is an extremely quiet and very capable submarine owing to its diesel-electric propulsion system. Running on electrical power while submerged, diesel-electric boats have been described as “a hole in the water” and are a vexing problem for the U.S. Navy. Developing ways to counter such vessels is a high-priority for Washington as many potential adversaries like China and Iran operate such submarines. Is it possible that one of New Delhi’s Russian-built Kilo-class diesel-electric attack submarines managed to “sink” a nuclear-powered U.S. Navy Los Angeles-class attack submarine during exercises in October 2015? The Indian submarine INS Sindhudhvaj (S56) allegedly “killed” USS City of Corpus Christi (SSN 705) during an exercise called Malabar that is held annually between India, Japan and the United States. Unknown, they had been marked, tailed and suitably ‘annihilated’ by the 533mm torpedos ‘fired’ by their Indian counterparts from on board the INS Sindhudhvaj. What came as a clincher to the Indian side was the tool which detected the USS Corpus Christi – the ‘made in India’ Ushus SONAR (Sound Navigation and Ranging) which was recently installed then. “The way it happens is that the Sindhudhvaj recorded the Hydrophonic Effect (HE) – simply put, underwater noise – of the nuclear powered submarine and managed to positively identify it before locking on to it. Being an exercise what did not happen was the firing,” explained a naval officer. The HE thus captured can easily slide into the elaborate database that the any navy maintains for classifying and identifying foreign submarines. A US embassy spokesperson said, “We have no information on the results to share.” After years of disallowing its presence in any naval exercise involving foreign navies – attributed to the IN’s desire to not its HE be recorded by a foreign player – this edition of MALABAR was the first time the Indian Navy (IN) allowed an EKM to take part. If the Indian description of the events is correct, it would be a bright spot in an otherwise dismal record for New Delhi’s undersea force. In recent years, the woefully neglected Indian submarine fleet has suffered numerous calamities. Submarines have run aground, caught fire and even sunk due to a combination of underinvestment, negligence and corruption. Perhaps the worst incident was when INS Sindhurakshak sank when at harbor in Mumbai after a series of explosions in the forward torpedo bay, killing eighteen sailors. Nonetheless, it’s not a huge surprise that a Russian-built Kilo would be able to defeat a Los Angeles-class attack boat. The Los Angeles-class is a dated design that is slowly being replaced by the newer and exponentially quieter Virginia-class submarine. However, it must be noted that we do not know the rules of engagement or parameters that the sides had agreed to. Furthermore, it must be noted there is the possibility of exaggeration. But the basic facts are that the Kilo is an extremely quiet and very capable submarine owing to its diesel-electric propulsion system. Running on electrical power while submerged, diesel-electric boats have been described as “a hole in the water” or a “black hole” and are a vexing problem for the U.S. Navy. Developing ways to counter such vessels is a high-priority for Washington as many potential adversaries like China and Iran operate such submarines. While diesel-electric boats are generally quieter than nuclear submarines, the U.S. Navy prefers atomic powered vessels because of their range, speed and endurance. The U.S. Navy’s global mission essentially mandates a vessel that can operate independently far from home waters for extended periods. Navies with a more localized mission can afford to operate short-range diesel-electric boats. While the Indian report may or may not be correct, this incident highlights the need to completely replace the Los Angeles-class with Virginia-class boats as soon as possible. The Virginia-class is orders of magnitude quieter and offers far better sensors and carries more weapons. The newer vessels are far more effective against threats like the Kilo than their Los Angeles-class predecessors. Buying as many Virginias as possible becomes especially important as more and more potential adversaries procure advanced diesel-electric boats like the Kilo or the even more capable Russian-built Amur. Source:- National Interest The post Do You Know Indian Kilo-Class submarine ‘Sink’ a U.S. Nuclear Attack Submarine Two Years Ago? appeared first on Indian Defence News.Indian Defence News - Defence Update Please Visit Our Site For Latest News On Indian Army, Navy and Airforce Indian Defence News.

India’s Next Generation Missile Boats will make Chinese Aircraft Obsolete

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Source:-India’s Next Generation Missile Boats will make Chinese Aircraft Obsolete Indian Navy plans to induct six new next generation Missile Boats/Vessels under make in India program. The missile vessel primary mission indicated as surface warfare unlike most other missile boats perform only Anti shipping.previously Indian navy used the Russian missile boats that can bring down entire Karachi and did awesome work in the 1971 WAR. and get the Nickname Killer Squadron. thus later replaced by the corvette’s. It seems navy didn’t satisfied those Corvette’s they need new generation missile Boats. but here the missile vessel have 8 VLS or Tubes for Surface attack this can be added with either Nirbhay LACM ( Land Attack Cruise Missile ) or Combination of Brahmos land attack and anti shipping cruise missiles. the Nirbhay can strike target far more than 1200 kilometers with impressive loitering capability. also flies at low level and reduced RCS. so hard to be tracked by enemy air defence radars. Mach 3 Capable Brahmos Cruise Missile is a fearsome Weapons system which even a Captain of an Aircraft carrier will fear due to its kinetic punch coming from its 300kg warhead and its ability to sink largest of the warships with ease. With MTCR restriction gone 800km BrahMos MK4 will be formidable Surface to Surface weapon system too which can be used to attack port and Naval facilities when required Missile boats will have reduced RCS. so it will be hard to be detected by enemy ships. and along with lower acoustic signatures to make the ship hard to be detect by sonar’s. both of these specification indicates the ship hull should be stealth in design and material. These ship will be able accomodate some 100 Navy personells include 11 officers. so the ship size provide beds and other living features and stocks food. Range and Endurance The ship should be attain the max speed of 35 knots. and at the cursing speed of 25 knots in any rough conditions such as sea state 4 or seat state 7 the ship should be perform it’s primary tasks as per the indicated speed. also the ship can be contentiously cruise at the speed of some 10 knots about 8 hours. and the ship should be in the sea for continuously next ten days and can able to come back to the port with 25% fuel reserve. the missile boat can also be take resupply and refuel from Tankers and Replenishment vessels to further increase the endurance and range. Weapon Pack Missile boats will carry 8 surface to surface missiles. but didn’t mentions stocks or reloading. These vessel also equipped with PDMS ( Point Defence Missile System ) that can perform targets in all sides that is provide cover of 360 degree. can also be engage the sea skimming and low flying AShM who flies below 3 meters above sea level. here again the RFI didn’t mentions reloading, Range and Anti Aircraft capability. as of now Barak 8 is the only option for this. The ship can also need a Gun that can engage both surface bombardment anti air and anti missile engagements. along with separate fire control radar.and mentioned the range more than some 15 kilometers I think OTO Melara 127/64 LW. They also informed the ship need a CIWS system which can be a stand alone version that can have Fire cotrol radar and EO ( Electro Optical ). along with target destruction of 360 degree. but the CIWS information can be normal like all others like range and detection. Defensive Packs The ship should have Chaff flares for confusing incoming enemy missiles. known as the ECM (elctronic Counter measure ). that can provide cover to the entire ship. the ships also accomodate small fire arms such as can hold Assault rifles for sailors and heavy machine gun and Anti material rifles for special operations. the ship also can smell the sonars who are all tracking the ships and can have high powerful search lights that can be operated by remotely. that will be very useful for search and rescue missions. the ship also can have upto three big size PTZ camera’s and two more fixed camera’s that should be work both night and day. Radars The ship can have main Fire Control radar that can control entire Weapons and guide them the correct directions and targets. the FCR should can accommodate with the naval comabat management system which can integrate all ships under one umbrella known as C4ISR. the ship also can have radars for Air surveillance for keep the air space under watch and another radar for surface search to keep watching surface ships movements. the ship also can have the proper Navigational system quoted in the RFI. The dimensions and ship displacement is not listed that means the ship manufacture should accommodate all the above in the ship. no matter of dimensions and displacement. Source:- Life OF Solider The post India’s Next Generation Missile Boats will make Chinese Aircraft Obsolete appeared first on Indian Defence News.Indian Defence News - Defence Update Please Visit Our Site For Latest News On Indian Army, Navy and Airforce Indian Defence News.

INS Vishal:- India’s Future Aircraft Carrier Update

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Source:-INS Vishal:- India’s Future Aircraft Carrier Update The Indian Navy’s latest aircraft carrier, the 65,000-ton supercarrier INS Vishal, the second ship of the Vikrant-class, will not be powered by a nuclear reactor as country’s premier nuclear institution, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) has said that it would take 15-20 years to develop a nuclear reactor capable enough to propel the 65,000-70,000 tonne vessel. INS Vishal will be able to accommodate up to 55 aircraft (35 fixed-wing combat aircraft and 20 rotary wing aircraft), launched using a catapult assisted take-off but arrested recovery (CATOBAR) aircraft launch system, incorporating U.S. defense contractor’s General Atomics’ new electromagnetic aircraft launch system (EMALS) technology, the Business Standard reports on November 7. At an estimated $5 billion, the fully equipped INS Vishal may be most expensive piece of machinery in the arsenal of India, which wants to match the pace at which China is developing its aircraft carriers. The final cost will also depend on the hardware installed. In India’s neighbourhood, Pakistan and Sri Lanka don’t possess aircraft carriers.China, which already has the 40,000-tonne CNS Liaoning, is developing a 50,000-tonne aircraft carrier. It plans to develop two more. An aircraft carrier, complete with fighter squadrons called Carrier Battle Groups (CBG), gives a navy strategic depth in the oceans. A CBG can control around 200,000 square nautical miles and can moving more than 600 nautical miles a day. The distance between Chennai and Colombo by the sea is 401 nautical miles. Given the incorporation of these new technologies, the Indian Navy source also revealed that the aircraft carrier will not enter service until the 2030s. It is still unclear when the construction of the new warship will begin. The INS Vishal will be the first non-Western aircraft carrier equipped with the complex CATOBAR launch capability. CATOBAR aircraft launch systems put less strain on the airframe of planes during takeoff reducing maintenance cost in the long run and also allows carrier-based aircraft to carry a heavier weapons payload. Furthermore, CATOBAR launch systems increase the sortie rates of carrier air wings by allowing a faster landing and takeoff rate. The Indian Navy’s preference for the CATOBAR aircraft launch system indicates that the new warship will in all likelihood not carry MiG-29K Fulcrum fighter jets, the current mainstay of India’s naval combat aviation. This will open up opportunities for competitors, in particular France and the United States, to push their naval combat aircraft. As I reported previously representatives of French aircraft maker Dassault Aviation pitched the naval version of the Dassault Rafale twin-engine, fourth generation multirole fighter to the Indian Navy in early 2016. (The United States has been quietly pushing Lockheed Martin’s F-35c Lightning II and McDonnell Douglas F/A 18 Hornets). The domestically designed and produced Tejas Light Combat Aircraft (LCA), next to being deployed aboard the INS Vikrant, India’s first indigenously built aircraft carrier, is also slated to serve on the INS Vishal, according to Indian Navy officials. Two naval prototypes of the Tejas LCA successfully conducted test flights from a so-called Shore Based Test Facility—a full-scale model of an aircraft carrier deck—in Goa earlier in the year. Nevertheless, senior Indian defense officials have repeatedly stated that the Indian Navy’s naval combat aviation requirements cannot be covered by domestic production. Selecting the right aircraft will be critical for India’s naval power. “The type of aircraft stationed aboard the new supercarrier will heavily influence the new vessel’s design and is thus of critical importance,” as I explained elsewhere. In the middle of 2015, Russia, France, the United Kingdom, and the United States received requests for “technical and costing proposals” by the Indian Navy’s Naval Design Bureau regarding the design of its new aircraft carrier. Should the adaptation of the CATOBAR system be officially confirmed, it will almost certainly rule out Russian participation in the construction of the carrier given strict U.S. export control and intellectual property restrictions. India has no experience with nuclear propulsion in a surface combat vessel, so U.S.-India or France-India technical cooperation on nuclear technology is a possibility. However, among other things, this would require changes to current U.S. nuclear policy. India and the United States have formed a Joint Working Group on Aircraft Carrier Technology Cooperation (JWGACTC) as part of the so-called bilateral Defense Trade and Technology Initiative (DTTI). According to publicly available information, the talks were largely confined to the the possibility of incorporating EMALS technology on the INS Vishal and did not discuss nuclear propulsion. Her EMALS CATOBAR system will allow her to launch heavier aircraft like larger fighters; unmanned air combat vehicles (UCAVs); turbo-prop airborne early-warning aircraft and aerial refueling tankers. INS Vishal remains under development, however, and it is unclear when her construction will begin. The Indian Navy has also expressed interest in purchasing Northrop Grumman’s E-2 Hawkeye, an American carrier-based tactical battle management system using early warning and command and control aircraft. That item has been on the Navy’s wish list for a considerable time. Indian Navy is planning for operating UCAVs from this carrier, as well as an AEW aircraft, and medium and light fighters. According to a naval planner, it “could greatly expand our mission envelope with UCAVs, using the pilot-less aircraft for high-risk reconnaissance and SEAD (suppression of enemy air defences). Mid-air refueling would let us keep UCAVs on mission for 24-36 hours continuously, since pilot fatigue would not be a factor.” This ship will cost three to four times the amount of the INS Vikrant which uses a combination of diesel-electric systems and gas turbines. Other costs include manpower, additional infrastructure costs for repairs, development. India has issued an RFI (request for information) for design services to a number of foreign shipyards. Initial discussions were held with the Russian, American, and French governments for developmental assistance. It is apparent, the new Supercarrier will not have the curved flight deck with the CATOBAR launch system installed and may look more like the Nimitz class carriers albeit smaller. The post INS Vishal:- India’s Future Aircraft Carrier Update appeared first on Indian Defence News.Indian Defence News - Defence Update Please Visit Our Site For Latest News On Indian Army, Navy and Airforce Indian Defence News.

Indian Navy v/s. Chinese Navy- Which Is More Powerful?

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Source:-Indian Navy v/s. Chinese Navy- Which Is More Powerful? Short Answer : Chinese Navy is stronger than Indian Navy but not strong enough to actually defeat Indian Navy.Ishabh Verma wrote an answer on Quora describing how Indian navy and Chinese navy compares with each other. Sounds complicated Eh? Long Answer : I have seen whenever someone ask a question like “X Navy Vs Y Navy” people start comparing numbers, that’s not how it works. In a war if everything solely relied on numbers then the Persians would have defeated the Greeks, the Persians would’ve defeated Alexander the great, the Romans would’ve defeated Hannibal, the Gauls would’ve defeated Julius Caesar, the Chinese would’ve defeated the Mongols, I think you got the idea. The thing is that there are a lot of factors that come into play when you compare armed forces of two different nations, from manpower to oil-reserves, from diplomatic relations to satellites. Indian Navy isn’t the only threat for Chinese Navy, from Vietnam to Singapore, from Japan to United States; China already has a lot of ‘enemies’ to deal with. While you’re reading this answer a super carrier strike group (like this one) is patrolling seas just few hundred miles of the coast of mainland China. That carrier is twice the size of the Chinese Carrier and nearly thrice the size of INS Vikramaditya!!!! And US has 11 of those bad boys!!!Every single one of those beauties packs enough firepower to wipe out a small nation from face of the earth. It’s true that China has a large Nuclear Submarine fleet but it need those submarines to deter that bad boy (or boys), China has to put up considerable strength in South China Sea, patrol Seas around Japan and South Korea and at the same time undertake anti-piracy patrols around Somalia. Indian Navy also faces a similar issue, It has to defend India from China but at the same time it also has to make sure that western Command is adequately prepared for any Pakistani aggression all at the same time combating pirates. I’m not going to compare Indian and Chinese Navy per se, because I don’t have access to information/resources to do so. (I doubt anyone on Quora has). I know most of you guys came here just to see the numbers so here’s a quick summary. Chinese Navy China has the 2nd largest Navy in the World in terms of displacement (after United States). China has 11 Nuclear Submarine in active service with at-least 4 more under construction. China has 57 Conventional Submarines with 5 more under construction. China has 1 Aircraft Carrier (67,000T) with 2 more(65,000T & 110,000T) under construction. China has 28 Destroyers with at-least 5 more under construction. China has 46 Frigates with at-least 4 more under construction. Behind these China has a huge fleet of smaller vessels, you can read more about them at People’s Liberation Army Navy Surface Force. Indian Navy India has the 5th largest Navy in the world in terms of displacement(after US,Chinese,Russian and British Navy). India has Two Nuclear Submarines(INS Arihant and INS Chakra) with 2 under construction while one will be launched within one Month INS Aridhaman and at-least 6 more planned. India has 13 Conventional Submarines with 6 under construction and at-least 6 more planned. India has 1 aircraft carriers INS Vikramaditya(45,000T) with one INS Vikrant(40,000T) under construction and one INS Vishal (65,000T) more planned. India has 10 Destroyers and 3 more under construction. India has 15 frigates with 7 more planned. Behind this India has a large fleet of smaller vessels, you can read more about them at List of active Indian Navy ships. It’s fairly easy to tell that China outnumbers India by 3 to 1 in almost every category. You must be wondering how India is going to survive against China? Well India could easily deal with China primarily because of these two reason, India and China do not share a Maritime border, rendering a direct naval engagement highly unlikely. I bet you’re shocked, “Wow!! India and China doesn’t share a Maritime border?!?!?”, Indian news channels have a habit of exaggerating everything. (Maritime borders : Marine Regions). Any sort of engagement between Chinese and Indian Navy will likely be between Indian Western Naval Command (which boats 2 aircraft carriers and at-least 40 other vessels) and small Chinese warships involved in anti-piracy counter-measures around Somalia, China can send some more ships/submarines (not nuclear Submarines as they will serve little to no tactical purpose) but it’s not something Western Naval command can’t handle. (Assuming they are able to get past the Eastern naval command) Geospatial strategy is definitely on India’s side. It’s doubtful in the extreme that any clash between Indian and Chinese forces would take place in the South China Sea or elsewhere in East Asia. The Indian Navy has plenty to do superintending events in the Indian Ocean and a bare minimum of assets to do it with. It has little to spare for extra-regional enterprises. Ergo, any probable naval war would unfold in India’s home region, where the Indian military enjoys “interior lines” and Chinese expeditionary forces must contend with “exterior lines.” What that means in plain English is this: The Indian navy enjoys direct, relatively short routes to potential scenes of battle while the PLA navy must project forces across long, distended, potentially contested sea routes just to reach the fight. Distance favors the defender while debilitating its adversary. Fighting across vast geographic distances imposes wear-and-tear on hardware while wearying crews. It imposes severe logistical burdens. After all, an expeditionary force must carry all the fuel, stores, and ammunition it needs to reach the scene of action and fight the battle. And fighting at a distance grants the antagonist opportunities to make mischief along the way. The foe or its allies could harry the expeditionary force, taking up station at key geographic sites — the Strait of Malacca, anyone? — to snipe away. The PLA navy force could suffer losses. At a minimum, a forward defense would compel Chinese mariners to expend scarce resources defending themselves. In short, powerful Indian forces reside near likely trouble spots, while China must operate along long, convoluted routes just to gain access to the region. It is no simple feat for a faraway great-power navy to overpower a rival naval power — even a weaker one — in that navy’s home waters. Advantage: India. Which brings us to geography. India is blessed by favorable nautical geography. The subcontinent juts into the Indian Ocean, adjoining potential battlegrounds in the Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea. Its geographical layout amplifies the advantages of the interior lines. Furthermore, New Delhi is sovereign over the Andaman and Nicobar Islands, an island chain athwart the western approaches to the Strait of Malacca. Suitably fortified with missiles, aircraft, and ships, the island chain would constitute a barrier to east-west Chinese maritime movement — enfeebling any force that ventures onto India’s turf. Geography, then, could represent India’s great equalizer against a more numerous Chinese navy. New Delhi can stage an anti-access/area-denial (A2/AD) strategy of its own, harnessing geographic features for strategic gain.So in short, both of them are pretty strong; attacking either of them will be a very very bad idea. So, who would prevail in the Sino-Indian naval war? It looks like a close-run thing. China has numbers on its side, but India’s allies include geography, land-based sea power, and silent partners such as the United States and Japan. Maybe Bambi’s not such a pushover after all. Both of them will do just fine as long they mind their own business and let the other live in peace. Source:- Qura and Foreign Policy The post Indian Navy v/s. Chinese Navy- Which Is More Powerful? appeared first on Indian Defence News.Indian Defence News - Defence Update Please Visit Our Site For Latest News On Indian Army, Navy and Airforce Indian Defence News.

DRDO Electromagnetic Railgun :- The Future Weapon Of Indian Navy

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Source:-DRDO Electromagnetic Railgun :- The Future Weapon Of Indian Navy Rail gun is a weapon capable of launching projectile without the usage of explosives or propellants, but, are launched at extremely high velocities, mach 7 (at sea level) or more. Capability of launching projectiles at velocities higher than guns and cannons makes rail gun hit targets at greater ranges capable of hitting the target with extreme speed and accuracy thus nullifying the escape factor of the enemy platform or an approaching projectile. With the usage of rail gun the hazards of usage of explosives and chemical propellants are evaded as well. Ever since the U.S. NAVY showed the power of the Railgun and its advantages,we in the Indian Defense Research organization feel that this latest weapon the electromagnetic railgun launcher will give our Naval forces in the Arabian sea a superlative advantage and a capability to launch devastating attacks on both land and sea targets. This gun uses a form of electromagnetic energy known as the Lorentz force to hurl a 230-250 pound projectile at speeds exceeding Mach 7-8. According to the DRDO website, a 12 mm square bore Electromagnetic Railgun (EMRG) has actually been tested. Another 30 mm square bore EMRG is also ready for tests.Their target is to accelerate a 1 kg projectile to a velocity of more than 2000 m/s (~Mach 6) with a capacitor bank of 10 Mega Joules. As of now it is in a rudimentary prototype stage and further tests are required to improve it’s performance and make it a feasible weapon system. The electromagnetic railgun represents an incredible new blistering offensive capability for our Navy which rules the Arabian sea right now. This capability will allow us to effectively counter a wide range of threats at a relatively low cost, while keeping our ships and sailors safer by removing the need to carry many high-explosive weapons on the ship. This massive railgun that we are developing needs just one navy-gunner/sailor to operate and it relies on the electromagnetic energy of the Lorentz force—the combination of electric and magnetic forces on a point charge—for power. The problem is that the only ships that will be able to generate the gargantuan 25 megawatts of power (enough to power almost 19,000 homes) required to fire the railgun are the aircraft Carrier and Destroyers The issue of power is a barrier that will get smaller with time. New capacitors, more resistant materials and better pulse power storage systems could all contribute to making the railgun more efficient. Computer-aided design, 3D printing techniques and better dielectric materials—materials that don’t conduct electricity but can store energy in the form of an electrostatic field—could all lead to making the EM railgun viable. The Indian Navy likes this weapon for several reasons, not the least of which it has a range of 200 miles and doesn’t require explosive warheads. That makes it far safer for sailors, and cheaper for taxpayers. According to the Indian Army and Navy experts each 12-inch diameter tapered projectile which is 6 feet in Length and 250 pounds costs about Rs 15,00,000, compared to Rs 7500,000 for conventional missiles. Also since the missiles are hurled at the speed of mach 7-8. they will hit their targets within seconds after being fired with explosive force. Testing OF Rail Gun: On 31st January 2008 U.S. Navy tested a rail gun that fired a projectile at 10.64 MJ with a muzzle velocity of 2,520 m/s. The required power was provided by a new 9-megajoule capacitor bank using solid-state switches and high-energy-density capacitors and an older 32-megajoule pulse power system from the US Army’s Green Farm Electric Gun Research and Development Facility. The rail gun is expected to be ready for deployment between 2020 to 2025. With the advent of rail gun as a weapon owing to its ultra high speed and accuracy which will allow for a abysmally small reaction time to evade its projectile, all airborne battle platforms like fighter jets and sea faring battle platforms like aircraft carriers and large ships will theoritically become outdated and will run the risk of unavoidable destruction once detected and targeted by the radar of the launching ship or platform harbouring the rail gun. Guided rail gun projectiles are also being thought of to be developed. It seems that future warfare attack as well as defence systems will have to depend on radars and launch platforms having the ability to respond within extremely small scope of reaction time and having the capability to launch hypersonic projectiles/missiles and ultra high energy DEW within that time to counter launches from platforms such as the rail gun. With such lethal launching platforms of weapon the launching platform which will detect and launch an attack first will hold a great advantage over its adversary. The post DRDO Electromagnetic Railgun :- The Future Weapon Of Indian Navy appeared first on Indian Defence News.Indian Defence News - Defence Update Please Visit Our Site For Latest News On Indian Army, Navy and Airforce Indian Defence News.

Operation Trident,1971 : How Indian Navy Pulled Off One Of Its Greatest Victories

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Source:-Operation Trident,1971 : How Indian Navy Pulled Off One Of Its Greatest Victories India has a rich history of naval warfare. In fact, Indian ships have made their presence felt since the time of Rajendra Chola’s 10th-century naval expedition to Southeast Asia and Maratha Admiral Kanhoji Angre’s 18th-century naval battles against the British, the Dutch and the Portuguese. This tradition of remarkable military exploits has continued even post-independence, with the Indian Navy playing a key role in at least four major military operations after 1947. There are several stories and anecdotes in the annals of the Indian Navy that illustrate why it has earned the reputation of a force to be reckoned with. But the most celebrated among them is the story of the audacious naval operation commemorated by India’s Navy Day, Operation Trident. Here’s the fascinating story of the mission that proved to be a turning point in the 1971 Indo-Pak war. In 1968, war clouds were already gathering on the horizon when the Indian Navy decided to acquire the Osa-I missile boats from the Soviet Union. Osa translates to ‘wasp’ in Russian and these boats did have a powerful sting thanks to their deadly ship-to-ship Styx missiles (that could blow the biggest enemy cruisers out of the water) and Range-out homing radars (that could out-range any naval radar of that era). Thus, the fast-moving and stealthy missile boats could look deep and strike deep. However, they had one crucial downside — designed primarily for coastal defence, they had a short range. Nonetheless, Indian Navy acquired eight Osa-Is, established its Missile Boats Squadron, and flew crew members to Russia for eight-month-long raining in the freezing Siberian winter. In early 1971, the boats were finally shipped to India. Since there were no heavy cranes in Mumbai, the boats were offloaded in Kolkata and towed along the coast to Mumbai. This was the genesis of a brilliant idea in the minds of India’s naval commanders that would go on to play a pivotal role in Operation Trident — if these boats could be towed from Kolkata to Mumbai, couldn’t their short range feature be overcome by towing them from Mumbai to Karachi? This audacious strategy would soon come to fruition. As dusk fell on December 3, 1971, at 5.45 PM, the Pakistan Air Force attacked six Indian airfields. The same night, IAF Canberra aircrafts struck Pakistani airfields as ground battles immediately commenced in nearly every sector. The Indo-Pak War of 1971 had begun and it was time for Indian Navy’s “Killer Squadron” to join the battle. On the night of December 3, a group of Osa-I missile boats — INS Nipat, INS Nirghat and INS Veer (individually under the commands of Lt. Cdrs. BN Kavina, IJ Sharma and OP Mehta and as a squadron under Cdr. BB Yadav) set sail from Mumbai harbour. The next day, on December 4, two Petya class Frigates — the INS Katchall (under Cdr. KN Zadu) and INS Kiltan (under Commander. G Rao) rendezvoused with the missile boats to form the Trident team. Sailing westward and then northwards, the Osa-Is were successfully towed to reach the Karachi harbour (the stronghold of the Pakistani Navy) by night. From there, the “wasps” proceeded in an arrowhead formation, changing course frequently with radar inputs from INS Kiltan to avoid enemy detection. Interestingly, the ship crews communicated in Russian, making the transmissions between the attacking vessels difficult to intercept for enemy ears! At 2243 hours, the Rangout radar on INS Nirghat picked up a big target — PNS Khaiber, a destroyer of Pak Navy. This was soon followed by the detection of two more targets, PNS Shah Jehan and merchant vessel Venus Challenger (carrying ammunition for the Pakistani Army). Without any delay, the missile boat squadron homed onto the targets with devastating precision and launched their Styx missiles in quick succession. Never realising what had hit their ships, the baffled Pakistani Navy assumed it was aircraft fire (IAF aircrafts had been strafing Pakistan’s Kemari oil tanks on the same day in an independent operation) and tried in vain to engage the Styx missiles with their anti-craft guns. In fact, PNS Khyber even transmitted a mayday signal saying it had been hit by enemy aircraft before it broke into two and sank. By this time, the Indian squadron had fixed their sight on the fuel storage facilities on the shore. Stretched to their endurance limits and virtually unprotected against air strikes, the three small missile boats launched their final missiles (setting the whole harbour complex on fire) before turning around and returning full speed to Bombay. Interestingly, while the Indian ships were retreating, the prevailing confusion led to the Pakistan Air Force scoring a self-goal by hitting its own frigate ship, PNS Zulfiqar (that it assumed to be an enemy boat)! On December 7, 1971, the Killer Squadron sailed into Bombay to a heroes’ welcome — in 90 minutes, it had fired six missiles, sunk three front-line enemy vessels and destroyed the oil storage facility at the Karachi harbour, without a single Indian casualty. Not content to rest on the laurels coming their way after the resounding success of Operation Trident, the Indian Navy repeated the feat just four days later in Operation Python — sinking another three ships of the Pakistani Navy and setting the oil stores on fire for the second time. By destroying its oil and ammunition supplies (and choking off resupply routes), these decisive victories drastically cut down Pakistan’s ability to continue engaging with the Indian forces. In fact, there was an effective blockade of the Karachi port without India having really declared one. More importantly, it proved to be an important turning point of the 1971 war, which would eventually lead to the liberation of Bangladesh. Such was Operation Trident’s unprecedented success that it made the world sit up and take note of the Indian Navy – the daring mission was part of the first item on US President Richard Nixon’s morning brief by the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) the next day. For their audacious planning, brilliant execution and outstanding bravery, all the three missile boat commanders were awarded the Vir Chakra while the man who led the “Killer Squadron”, Commander (later Commodore BB Yadav) was honoured with the Mahavir Chakra. In a fitting tribute to these courageous men who pulled off one of the great sea-faring victories in Indian naval history, December 4 has also been celebrated as Navy Day ever since. Source Link: The Better India The post Operation Trident,1971 : How Indian Navy Pulled Off One Of Its Greatest Victories appeared first on Indian Defence News.Indian Defence News - Defence Update Please Visit Our Site For Latest News On Indian Army, Navy and Airforce Indian Defence News.

Barak 8 :: Indo-Israel Developed Air Defense System? Able to Intercept Brahmos?

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Source:-Barak 8 :: Indo-Israel Developed Air Defense System? Able to Intercept Brahmos? Barak 8 also known as LR-SAM or as MR-SAM is an Indian-Israeli surface-to-air missile (SAM), designed to defend against any type of airborne threat including aircraft, helicopters, anti-ship missiles, and UAVs as well as cruise missiles and combat jets out to a maximum range of 70 km, however, reports suggest the missile has been increased to a maximum range of 90 km following “range upgrade discussions” between India and Israel during November 2014.Some news agencies have referred to the missiles range at 100 km.Both maritime and land-based versions of the system exist. The Barak-8 has been designed to defend against a variety of short-to-long-range airborne threats, including fixed-wing aircraft, helicopters, drones and projectiles. It incorporates a state-of-the-art phased array multi- mission radar, two-way data link, and a flexible command and control system that enables it to simultaneously engage multiple targets day and night and in all-weather conditions. Due to the comprehensive simulation and preliminary subsystem testing, only three flight tests are sufficient to clear the system for operational induction. Additional tests will follow the initial phase to further explore the system’s performance and capability enhancements. Barak 8 is based on the original Barak 1 missile and is expected to feature a more advanced seeker, alongside range extensions that will move it closer to medium range naval systems like the RIM-162 ESSM or even the SM-2 Standard. Israel successfully tested its improved Barak II missile on July 30, 2009. The radar system provides 360 degree coverage and the missiles can take down an incoming missile as close as 500 meters away from the ship. Key Features Advanced Guidance System: The system comes with a four plane MF-STAR radar, a multifunction surveillance track and detection radar system. The radar uses multibeam, pulse Doppler and electronic counter-counter measures (ECCM) techniques to detect fast moving and low-RCS targets in complex environments. The MF-STAR radar system provides 360degree coverage around the mother ship. High Kill probability: Israeli missile defence systems are notorious for their precision guided missiles. Missile systems like Arrow, Iron Dome are notorious for their reputation. Fire and Forget: a common term used in missile technology, is the ability of a missile to guide itself to its target using onboard computer. Barak-8 comes with an advanced seeker module that can track the target on its own without any guidance from Control. The active Radio and Infrared seekers aboard the missile provides real time data to onboard computers to guide itself to the target. Multirole capability: Most other LRSAMs have a minimum range of 3km, over which the system can efficiently track and destroy the target. However for BARAK-8, the minimum range is a meagre 0.5km even lesser than the US standard ESSM. Highly Manoeuvrable: BARAK-8 has indigenous Dual-pulse rocket motor with added TVC (Thrust Vector Control) gives very high manoeuvrability. It enables the missile to engage high altitude and supersonic sea-skimming targets. Multiple Simultaneous Engagements: A single Barak system can engage multiple targets at the same time thereby providing necessary defence during saturation attacks. The Kolkata class destroyers currently carries only 4x8cell BARAK-8 VLS, a total of 32 when other ships of same class carry up to twice that number of their systems. This could be attributed to Indian Navy’s confidence in BARAK-8 system. How India Helped? 1) India did not help Israel technologically. Israel is far ahead of India in the field of tactical missiles. 2) India helped Israel financially because India wanted a missile that did a better job than most LRSAM (Long Range Surface to Air Missile) available at the time of conception of the project. But why? China also has supersonic missiles similar to Brahmos (albeit with more range). The Barak -8 project gave Indian scientists and engineers an idea of how to develop world class anti aircraft missiles. (or if you prefer air interdiction missiles) IIRC, The Propulsion and fuel part of the missile is made in India; while Israel makes the sensors; homing mechanism and the warhead. Also the Indian BVR AAM Astra is based on the experience gained from Barak-8 Also, To answer this Question(Why India Develops Barak-8), one needs to understand that there are Chinese CX-1 or CM-400AKG which is having similar features of brahmos, which means its mach-3 and it poses serious threat to indian navy and missile defenses. so, the better option is to build an interceptor which can intercept mach-3 missiles. CM-400AKG is also sold to pakistan worst possible enemy. so to eliminate this the Barak 8 was jointly developed with isreal. however US says CM-400AKG is not operational or still in development phases. but india thinks its better to have defenses against mach 3 missiles. hence at the moment india has both the killer and savior both for higher supersonic missiles. So, coming to the million dollar question. Is it intended for Brahmos AShM? We cannot say that it is intended for Brahmos systems as India already operates the missile and the chance that any of our enemies getting their hands on it is rare. However considering the Yakhont missile from which Brahmos missile is derived and the chance of it finding its way to our enemies is not so pleasing. Also, Israel’s immediate threats coincidentally purchased Yakhont missiles, for which people misunderstood as the driving force for BARAK-8. Israeli ships carried only short range SAMs and didn’t have modern radars capable of handling a dedicated attack by its enemies using Yakhont missiles. The answer to this problem was the extremely agile and accurate Barak-8 which packed the best available technology into a medium sized missile. With a max range of 90+ km, it operates in conjunction with the MF-STAR radar which can detect sea-skimming missiles at 30-35 km range. It combined a medium range and short range missile into one missile, having a minimum engagement range of just 300 m and max of 90+ km. There are claims that a single Barak-8 can stop a BrahMos as close as 500 m from a ship. One of the reasons behind the claims is that the Barak-8 is very accurate and has an active homing radar seeker, which enables the ship to technically forget about the missile after its launch and the missile finds the target on its own although the ship does provide guidance and mid-course updates. Since the Barak-8 can have a continuous lock on the incoming missile with its own radar and the MF-STAR can guide 24 Barak-8 missiles to 12 targets simultaneously, the saturation limit for a Kolkata-class destroyer against the BrahMos stands at 12 missiles. This, however, is a contradiction in itself as the Kolkata class carries the BrahMos as well as the Barak-8. This means that deploys the poison and the antidote on the same platform. According to Defence Experts, the missile system delivers an accurate, high quality, real-time arena situation picture and extracts low Radar Cross Section (RCS) targets even in the toughest environmental conditions. It is a digital Active Electronic Steering Array (AESA) Radar System which incorporates new and advanced technologies. The Barak 8 missile system can operate by night as well as by day in addition to all weather conditions. It is capable of successfully dealing with simultaneous threats engagements, even in severe saturation scenarios. The tested and proven BARAK-8 is a standard additive in all Project 15A destroyers and Kamorta class corvettes currently in service with the Indian Navy. An upgraded version BARAK-8ER (Extended Range to 100+km) will be an additive in Vishakapatnam class destroyers and Project 17A Guided missile frigates. Some Content Of this Post is Copied From Article on Defence Lover Site The post Barak 8 :: Indo-Israel Developed Air Defense System? Able to Intercept Brahmos? appeared first on Indian Defence News.Indian Defence News - Defence Update Please Visit Our Site For Latest News On Indian Army, Navy and Airforce Indian Defence News.